2019 Acura RDX A Spec Sportifies A Top Seller

You never get a second chance to make a good first impression and Acura’s designers are onto it. That’s just what’s behind the new look of their latest product: The all-new, third-generation RDX.

I recently spent some quality time with the sporty-mid-line 2019 RDX A-Spec, which gives drivers the RDX’s most athletic package, a hearty helping of dynamic cosmetics, and a big taste of this machine’s high-tech offerings.

This is a fresh face in a sea of familiar premium crossover faces, and it flaunts some unique touches, including a contrasty look enabled by the black accents and wheels set against my tester’s white paint, which seemed to make the details pop.

Fake exhaust finishers embedded into the bumper need not apply — RDX’s dual exhausts are authentic and look fantastic.

Hop aboard, and a world of stitching and suede and metallic trim and layer upon layer of depth and detail spread around you. Acura has effectively created a distinctive atmosphere, in addition to how thickly this cockpit is lined with details and curves and edges, it’s also dotted with unique shapes and colours and interfaces.

Included were some of the most gorgeous instruments I’ve ever seen (precision red needles floating just above two round, metallic discs) and a drive-mode selector dial fixed smack in the middle of the centre stack.

The cabin is a real looker and that’s not something you often say about an Acura, as they’re typically machines bought because of a reputation for reliability, residual value, safety and sensibility, more than how they look or drive.

The sweet-sounding and free-breathing V6 from the last-generation model has been replaced with a new two-litre four-cylinder turbocharged for 272 horsepower and even more torque.

This new engine needs few revs to scoot along in city traffic, puts plenty of torque at the tip of your toes, and sounds like an old-school Honda VTEC engine when pushed. RDX’s old V6 emitted a refined howl when called upon, and the new four-cylinder, though less pleasing to hear, has a more eager and hard-working soundtrack when pushed.

A 10-speed automatic helps enhance efficiency and performance, and super handling all wheel drive enables the strategic overpowering of certain wheels in certain situations to enhance performance and balance and friskiness.

Twist the drive mode selector dial to engage comfort, sport, sport plus or snow drive modes, each with its own unique set of parameters engaged to change the feel and attitude of the RDX. It’s nearly like having four vehicles in one.

Functionally, it hits most marks. In typical Acura fashion, the cabin is nicely optimized for storage of smaller items — there are bins, cubbies, compartments and consoles everywhere, plenty of charging ports to keep mobile electronics juiced, and a large opening below the hollowed-out centre console for even more storage.

In back, a motorized tailgate opens on a flat and wide cargo hold, complete with hidden in-floor storage and a deep bin at one rear corner.

Front seats are easily boarded and exited with a lateral slide, and rear seats are adequate for use by two average-sized adults, with legroom that’s notably generous. It’s comfortably big enough for four adults — not cavernous, not cramped.

Notable from the drive? The engine is a flexible performer: light throttle inputs see generous low-end torque whisk the RDX along discreetly, the 10-speed transmission shifting up early and often and invisibly for a refined experience.

Conversely, when opened up, there’s a free-breathing feel to the power-curve, with a sense of rising action and torque galore. This engine sounds better than the norm for most modern turbo four-cylinders, and has a swelling, peaky shape to the power curve that’s entertaining.

The brakes are strong, nearly startlingly-powerful when applied in full, though the pedal lacks much of the precision and feedback I often appreciate elsewhere in the segment. Ditto the paddle shift mode; it’s enjoyable to use, but many competitors shift faster, and more instantly, when drivers click-to-shift.

Headlight performance is top notch after dark and ride quality is decidedly sporty. This A-Spec version of the RDX is for the enthusiast driver, and it rides like a luxury sports sedan, heavy on the sport.

Though ride quality takes a dive on rougher in-town roads, the benefit is a crossover that feels smaller and lighter than it is when pushed in fast corners. Enthusiast drivers will like the setup, though comfort-first shoppers may wish to consider a less-sporty variant. Note that in sport + mode, RDX’s steering heavies and tightens up, approximating the steering feel of a three-bucks-a-lap go-kart.

Gripes include the push-button gear shifter, and the track-pad powered central-command system, both of which feel moderately awkward for a good long while before becoming second nature. Be patient when using the central command track-pad as it’s somewhat frustrating and imprecise until you’ve logged a few hours.

Ultimately, aside from a fussy shifter and command interface, here’s a compelling luxury crossover for the driving and tech enthusiast, at a compelling cost: The $50,000 asking price for this sports-enhanced, nicely-loaded RDX barely opens the bidding on numerous base-model German competitors.

The specs

Source : https://www.thetelegram.com/wheels/2019-acura-rdx-a-spec-sportifies-a-top-seller-247629/

Thank you for visit my website
2019 Acura RDX A-Spec sportifies a top seller
2019 Acura RDX A-Spec Long-Term Arrival: Wallflower Days Are Over
2019 Acura RDX A-Spec - A Return To Form For Honda's Performance Division
Acura to debut 2019 RDX crossover, A-Spec variant in production form at New York Auto Show
2018 Acura RDX A-Spec by Graham Rahal Performance
2019 Acura RDX compact crossover: Details make the difference
2019 Acura RDX crossover gets turbocharged power, A-Spec version
2019 Acura RDX Is The Latest Take On An Old Problem: How To Control The Display Screen?