Span Of Control: Securing The Hybrid Cloud

Many organizations have such a positive first experience with cloud computing that they quickly want to move to a hybrid cloud environment with data and workloads shared between private and public clouds. The flexibility and control that a hybrid cloud provides is why it is expected to be the dominant cloud computing model for the foreseeable future.

However, companies often don’t think about security issues until after they are well along in the process of building a hybrid cloud. This can lead to nasty surprises when they realize this environment introduces some unique security considerations that don’t exist in traditional infrastructure. That’s why a hybrid cloud needs to be secure by design.

Cloud Security Is a Shared Responsibility

Public cloud providers offer enterprise-class security, but that doesn’t absolve customers from responsibility for protecting data, enforcing access controls and educating users. Private cloud security is complicated because private clouds can take many forms. They may be hosted entirely on-site, entirely in the public cloud or some combination. Private cloud infrastructure can also be dedicated to a single tenant or shared across multiple zones with isolation providing dedicated resources. Each environment has different security demands.

The scale and dynamism of cloud computing complicates visibility and control. Many customers incorrectly believe that cloud providers take care of security. In fact, security is a shared responsibility. In my experience, most cloud security failures occur because customers don’t live up to their part of the bargain.

No single cloud security mechanism does the entire job. There is also little consensus about what the ideal cloud security environment should look like. As a result, most product offerings in this market are still evolving. Secure by design starts with assessing risk and building a framework for technology.

A New Way of Computing

Moving to the cloud doesn’t mean relinquishing total control, but it does require embracing a new security mindset based on identity, data and workloads rather than underlying platforms. Security professionals who can reorient themselves around business enablement rather than device protection are particularly well-suited to securing public clouds.

Cloud computing is highly distributed and dynamic, with workloads constantly spinning up and down. Visibility is essential for security. According to Gartner, cloud security should address three core topics that have not traditionally been an IT discipline: multitenancy risk, virtualization security and software-as-a-service (SaaS) control.

Multitenancy risk is inherent to cloud architectures because multiple virtual machines (VMs) share the same physical space. Major public cloud providers go to great lengths to mitigate the possibility that one tenant could access data in another VM, but on-premises infrastructure is susceptible if the servers are not configured properly. Changes made to one hybrid cloud environment may also inadvertently affect another.

Virtualization security refers to the unique risks of virtualized environments. While hypervisors and VMs are in many ways more secure than bare-metal environments because the operating system is isolated from the hardware, the use of shared resources like storage and networking also introduces potential vulnerabilities that don’t exist on dedicated servers.

SaaS environments require greater attention to authentication and access control because the user doesn’t own the network. Governance standards need to be put in place to ensure that users take appropriate precautions with data and that all necessary regulatory and compliance guidelines are met.

Without these new competencies, organizations will struggle to gain visibility into their hybrid cloud environments, making it almost impossible to determine which computing and storage tasks are taking place where, using which data and under whose direction. In that situation, provisioning and enforcement of policy can quickly become impractical. But if organizations practice secure-by-design principles using new cloud-native tools, they can get a single-pane-of-glass view into activity that enables policy enforcement.

Three Keys to Secure Hybrid Cloud Deployments

Three areas merit special attention: encryption, endpoint security and access control.

Encryption is the best form of data protection. Data moving to and from the public cloud should be encrypted at all stages, and sensitive data should never be left unencrypted. All cloud providers support encryption, but not necessarily by default. Customers need to choose the type of encryption that is most appropriate and secure encryption keys.

When public cloud services are accessed over the public internet, special attention needs to be paid to endpoint security to prevent the risk of creating access points for attackers or becoming targets of malware. For example, an attacker who compromises a PC and logs on as an administrator for the company’s public cloud effectively has the keys to the kingdom. Hardware firewalls aren’t protection enough.

Secure web gateways (SWGs) utilize URL filtering, advanced threat defense (ATD) and malware detection to protect organizations and enforce internet policy compliance. SWGs are delivered as both physical and virtual on-premises appliances, cloud-based services or hybrid cloud/on-premises solutions. They provide an additional layer of protection against destructive attacks such as ransomware and enable safer and more efficient adoption of cloud-based services.

Finally, cloud-specific access control is a necessity if employees, contractors and vendors are to use both public and private clouds. Single sign-on (SSO) and federated access controls can minimize inconvenience while maintaining control and security monitoring.

Identity and access management-as-a-service (IDaaS) works in both multitenant and dedicated environments. It provides identity governance and administration, access management, and analytics functions that span the organization’s entire cloud environment. IDaaS can also be integrated with existing access management software to manage access to legacy applications.

The Cloud Security Alliance has an extensive library of resources that cover practices for hybrid cloud security. Organizations should familiarize themselves with these guidelines before beginning the migration process. Building security into hybrid infrastructure from the beginning minimizes the pain and delay of backfilling later.

Source : https://securityintelligence.com/moving-to-the-hybrid-cloud-make-sure-its-secure-by-design/

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